Previously, on Slack…

It is hard to believe now, glancing over our back catalogue, that there was a time before this blog existed. But there was. And back then, several vitally…

It is hard to believe now, glancing over our back catalogue, that there was a time before this blog existed. But there was. And back then, several vitally important pieces of Slack knowledge were published.

It’s just darned awful to think people might miss out, so just in case you haven’t read them, this is your chance.

Always worth linking (and something we get asked about a lot) there’s a guide to getting your team started on Slack.

It’s mainly aimed at owners and admins of new teams, but keep an eye out: We’ll be adding more guides for different types of user soon.

If you are at the beginning of your integration journey, gazing down a road filled with promise, though, it might be worth doing this little Google Docs integration test to check just how well the integrations can work for you.

Meanwhile, if you’ve been Slacking for a while, but want to take things to the next level: 11 tips for leveling up in Slack.

And if you’ve had your interest piqued by the brief mention of the quick switcher in that last link but have never used it, you should: it’s both incredibly powerful and lovely to use. More here from Johnny Rodgers, who probably knows it better than anyone.

And finally, Stewart Butterfield’s internal memo sent to the team in the early days of making Slack: “We Don’t Sell Saddles Here”, which sums up the hard work, passion, values and intense thought that runs through every part of what we do at Slack. Usefully, it also serves as a single-click answer to the people wondering whether we sell saddles or not.

Spoiler: we don’t.

Slack is the collaboration hub, where the right people are always in the loop and key information is always at their fingertips. Teamwork in Slack happens in channels — searchable conversations that keep work organized and teams better connected.